Haunted History Time!

If you like haunted historic places & things then this is for you! It’s a list of links to most of the haunted history posts I’ve made over the past few years. Also, from now until Halloween, I’ll be posting at least one new haunted historic place or thing per day. I hope you enjoy & let me know if you have any haunted history requests? Thanks for following & Happy Early Halloween!

The Real Dracula’s Castle and yes, it’s haunted!

Ireland’s Gate to Hell: Oweynagat (The Cave of Cats)

The Medieval Vampire Pirate Mayor of Sozopol

The Black Shuck of Peddars Way, Norfolk

17th Century Pendle Witch’s Cottage with a Bricked-in Mummified Cat

Ghosts of Dunnottar Castle

Witch Bottle, England, Circa 16th-17th Century

Witch Protection Sign in Colchester Castle, Essex

Paranormal Phenomena at Berry Pomeroy Castle

Ghosts and Death Omens at Brodick Castle

The Haunting of Hermitage Castle

Irish turnip Jack-o’-lantern, Early 20th Century

Haunted Inchdrewer Castle

Paranormal activity in the Roman Colosseum

Crook of Devon Witch Trials & Tullibole Castle

Sir Walter Scott and the Baldoon Castle Ghost

Haunted Borthwick Castle

The Black Dog of Ogrodzieniec Castle, Poland

The Ghost of Wicked Jimmy, The Gloomy Earl of Lowther Castle

The Ghostly Hound of Barnbougle

Phantom Hitchhiker at Nunney Castle, Somerset

Melrose Abbey: Vampires, Wizards and Ghosts…oh my!

Haunted and Cursed Edinample Castle

Haunted Menzies Castle

The Phantom Horse of Old Castle Lachlan

The Vampire of Alnwick Castle

Ghosts of Dunstanburgh Castle

Haunted Spynie Palace

Ghosts & Omens at the Wine Tower, Kinnaird Head

The Ghost of Queen Katherine Parr at Sudeley Castle

Haunted Glamis Castle

Dunskey Castle Ghosts

The Ghost of Barcaldine Castle, Scotland

The Ghosts of Bamburgh Castle

The Two Ghosts of Ardvreck Castle

Schiehallion - The Fairy Mountain

The Ghost of Ackergill Tower

Bunchrew House & Ghost

The Ghost of Rait Castle

The Witch Tree

Haunted Knock Castle, Isle of Skye

Loch Leven Castle and Mary, Queen of Scots

Ghosts and Legends of Ardvreck Castle and Calda House

Doonagore Castle and The Haunted Beach

Duffus Castle: Ghosts and a Big Cat

The Last Witch’s Tree

The Green Lady of Crathes Castle

Egyptian Effigy ‘Voodoo’ Doll, C. 3rd-4th Century AD

Hecate, the goddess of… Trick or Treating?

Coligny (Celtic) Calendar, the Origin of Halloween

(P.S. I have no idea why this is showing up as all caps on my blog, sorry about that. It looks normal on my dashboard though.  I can’t seem to fix it.)

Bilingual Sumerian Proverbs, Babylonia c. 2000-1700 BC
Written in Neo Sumerian and Old Babylonian cuneiform on clay, containing 42 proverbs, a folk tale and a fable. This is the only known major bilingual proverb tablet of Old Babylonian origin.
Some of the proverbs say:
-Strength does not compare to the possession of intelligence.
- My strength is my god, but it is finished by myself.
- A swift one caught a gazelle, but a strong man carried it away.
- The small pig roots, “I will not eat it for pleasure” he said.
The folk tale is about a man getting increasingly old, his declining physical abilities, and the effect of a young girl on him. It is the oldest known example of a theme well attested in later world literature. The best known examples are 1 Kings 1:1 ff. and 2:17 ff., Eccl. 12: 1-7, and the Merchant’s Tale in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.
themanwiththebowtie:

allmesopotamia:

archaicwonder:

Assyrian Foundation Plaque, reign of Tukulti-Ninurta I, c.1243-1207 BC
On gypsum alabaster in cuneiform. The text says:
 Tukulti-Ninurta, king of the universe, strong king, king of Assyria, king of kings, lord of lords, rulers of rulers, prince, lord of all, conqueror of the rebellious — those who do not submit (to him and) who are hostile to Ashur —, defeater of the prince of the Qutu as far as the land Mehru, disperser of the forces of the land of the Shubaru and the remote lands Nairi as far as the border of Makan, strong king, capable in battle, the one who shepherds the four quarters at the heels of the god Shamash, I; son of Shalmaneser (I), king of the universe, king of Assyria; son of Adad-narari (I) (who was) also king of the universe and king of Assyria: At that time the temple of the Assyrian Ishtar, my mistress, which Ilu-Shumma, my forefather, the prince, had previously built — that temple had become dilapidated and I cleared away its debris. I changed its site. I founded (it) in another place. I made it more outstanding than ever before. As an addition I built the room of the Shahuru and lofty towers. I completed that temple from top to bottom. I built within a lofty dais (and) an awesome sanctuary for the abode of the goddess Ishtar, my mistress, and I deposited my monumental inscription. May a later prince restore it (and) return my inscribed name to its place. (Then) the goddess Ishtar will listen to his prayers. As for the one who removes my inscription and my name: May the goddess Ishtar, my mistress, extinguish his sovereignty, break his weapon, cause his manhood to dwindle away, (and) hand him over to his enemies.
Tukulti-Ninurta I was a king of Assyria during the Middle Assyrian Empire. He succeeded Shalmaneser I, his father, as king and won a major victory against the Hittite Empire at the Battle of Nihriya in the first half of his reign, appropriating Hittite territory in Asia Minor and the Levant. He retained Assyrian control of Urartu, and later defeated Kashtiliash IV, the Kassite king of Babylonia and captured the rival city of Babylon to ensure full Assyrian supremacy over Mesopotamia. Tukilti-Ninurta I set himself up as king of Babylon, thus becoming the first native Mesopotamian to rule there, its previous kings having all been non native Amorites or Kassites. He took on the ancient title “King of Sumer and Akkad” first used by Sargon of Akkad.

THIS IS FOR SALE????!How?

This should be in a museum. 

Ikr? Yes, it really should be in a museum. While writing this blog, I come across so many privately owned antiquities that should be in museums for everyone to see. It’s sad. I try to post things that are up for auction (as opposed to artifacts already in museums) because once they are sold, they may never be seen by the public again.
Assyrian Foundation Plaque, reign of Tukulti-Ninurta I, c.1243-1207 BC
On gypsum alabaster in cuneiform. The text says:
 Tukulti-Ninurta, king of the universe, strong king, king of Assyria, king of kings, lord of lords, rulers of rulers, prince, lord of all, conqueror of the rebellious — those who do not submit (to him and) who are hostile to Ashur —, defeater of the prince of the Qutu as far as the land Mehru, disperser of the forces of the land of the Shubaru and the remote lands Nairi as far as the border of Makan, strong king, capable in battle, the one who shepherds the four quarters at the heels of the god Shamash, I; son of Shalmaneser (I), king of the universe, king of Assyria; son of Adad-narari (I) (who was) also king of the universe and king of Assyria: At that time the temple of the Assyrian Ishtar, my mistress, which Ilu-Shumma, my forefather, the prince, had previously built — that temple had become dilapidated and I cleared away its debris. I changed its site. I founded (it) in another place. I made it more outstanding than ever before. As an addition I built the room of the Shahuru and lofty towers. I completed that temple from top to bottom. I built within a lofty dais (and) an awesome sanctuary for the abode of the goddess Ishtar, my mistress, and I deposited my monumental inscription. May a later prince restore it (and) return my inscribed name to its place. (Then) the goddess Ishtar will listen to his prayers. As for the one who removes my inscription and my name: May the goddess Ishtar, my mistress, extinguish his sovereignty, break his weapon, cause his manhood to dwindle away, (and) hand him over to his enemies.
Tukulti-Ninurta I was a king of Assyria during the Middle Assyrian Empire. He succeeded Shalmaneser I, his father, as king and won a major victory against the Hittite Empire at the Battle of Nihriya in the first half of his reign, appropriating Hittite territory in Asia Minor and the Levant. He retained Assyrian control of Urartu, and later defeated Kashtiliash IV, the Kassite king of Babylonia and captured the rival city of Babylon to ensure full Assyrian supremacy over Mesopotamia. Tukilti-Ninurta I set himself up as king of Babylon, thus becoming the first native Mesopotamian to rule there, its previous kings having all been non native Amorites or Kassites. He took on the ancient title “King of Sumer and Akkad” first used by Sargon of Akkad.
Roman Rock Crystal and Gold Necklace, c. 1st-2nd Century AD
Composed of fourteen scaraboid shaped rock crystal beads, form-fit with gold collars soldered to small cylindrical gold sheet terminations; fourteen conical rock crystal beads; one compressed sphere bead.