Greek torque with pitcher and ball pendants, 8th-7th century BC
Bronze with green patina. Of twisted conical hoop, with flat and forged ends. Affectionate four different neighborhood, pierced ball pendant and a small Pitcher. 
Babylonian medical treatments for the prolapsed rectum of a male virgin, from Uruk c. 300 BC
I’ve included a few of the more interesting prescriptions here. See the source for a full translation. 
If a youth who has not known a woman suffers a prolapse of the rectum, you crush a… and a … and you have him drink it in beer, and/or massage him with it in oil. If it is not relieved by potions or salves, if it is his right testicle apply heat to his left shoulder blade; if it is his left testicle, apply heat to his right shoulder blade. If a youth who has not known a woman suffers a prolapse of the rectum, you boil up a lizard; he drinks the fluid and he will recover. If a youth who has not known a woman suffers a prolapse of the rectum, you sit him up to his waist in stale fine flour and wheat flour in a … of … sesame, and he will recover.
Roman Gold Taranis “Wheel’ Pendant, 1st-3rd century AD
In Celtic mythology Taranis was the god of thunder worshipped essentially in Gaul, Gallaecia, Britain and Ireland, but also in the Rhineland and Danube regions, amongst others. Taranis, along with Esus and Toutatis as part of a sacred triad, was mentioned by the Roman poet Lucan in his epic poem Pharsalia as a Celtic deity to whom human sacrificial offerings were made.
Taranis was associated, as was the cyclops Brontes (“thunder”) in Greek mythology, with the wheel. Many representations of a bearded god with a thunderbolt in one hand and a wheel in the other have been recovered from Gaul, where this deity apparently came to be syncretized with Jupiter.
Symbolic votive wheels were offered at shrines (such as in Alesia), cast in rivers (such as the Seine), buried in tombs or worn as amulets since the Middle Bronze Age.