Late Victorian or Early Edwardian Etruscan Revival Gold Necklace with Gold Coins of Philip II & Alexander III the Great (359-323 BC)

Ten Gold staters and one gold distater mounted in a late Victorian or Edwardian Etruscan Revival gold necklace. Likely crafted in Greece or Cyprus circa 1870-1910, the necklace contains a central gold distater of Alexander (Price 163) which may be a cast replica (without removal from mount it’s hard to be certain). All of the remaining 10 gold staters, nine of Alexander and one of Philip II, appear to be quite genuine, conditions ranging from a rough fine (the Philip, also holed) to nearly extremely fine. Among them are three dated issues of Sidon (one of 325-324 BC [Price 3486] and two of 324-323 BC [Price 3490]); four of Amphipolis (Price 176 [2], 172 and 168), and a couple in which the mintmark is obscured by the mounting bezel. Coins are set in ornate openwork 14 k gold frames joined by delicate chains in a golden cascade, interspersed with numerous florate pendants set with small pearls; a heart-shaped central drop pendant set with six tiny pearls completes the ensemble. Total weight: 170.03 gm.

Reportedly from the collections of General H. L. Haughton, a British officer in service in India circa 1890-1930, and of Sir Ronald Storrs, British Governor-General of Cyprus 1926-1932. Sold for $28,750.